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What does pulmonary–renal syndrome stand for?

Abstract

Pulmonary–renal disorder (PRS) is an emergency situation described by a rapidly progressive course without an early intervention. It is appropriate time to review this disorder, this is may be attributable to frequent patients’ attendance to pulmonologist with both vague pulmonary and/or renal symptoms with disproportionate lack of information concerning consequent care. In addition, the outcome data for PRS still confined to little studies with limited follow-up. An updated working knowledge of PRS including the disease pathogenesis, complications as well as quickly advancing field focused on current new immunomodulatory therapies which offer life-saving options for refractory disease. An often-multi-disciplinary team is required for management. Early rapid identification relies upon a high index of clinical suspicious, carful medical evaluation, accessible laboratory investigations, imaging study, histopathology, with exclusion of differential diagnosis. An accurate diagnosis, exclusion of infection, close monitoring of the patient as well as timely initiation of aggressive therapy are crucial for the patient’s outcome. The mortality rate of PRS, reach up to 25–50 % [1].

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Correspondence to Taghreed S. Farag MD.

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Farag, T.S., Farag, A.S. What does pulmonary–renal syndrome stand for?. Egypt J Bronchol 12, 1–13 (2018). https://doi.org/10.4103/ejb.ejb_6_17

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Key words

  • diffuse alveolar hemorrhage
  • glomerular filtration rate
  • pulmonaryrenal syndromes
  • rapid progressive glomerulonephritis